Multiple Exposures

Multiple exposures have come a long way since the first time I ever saw one. Lots of folks associate a multiple exposure image with one of those “twisty turny” images or “repeating line” tree images. For me, I like to see the movement within the image and the softness that can be created with multiple exposures. A few years ago I started creating what I call a soft/sharp effect with multiple exposures. It is one of my favorites, but I have added an additional step to the mix…I start by setting up now for a (3) image multiple exposure and follow my original soft/sharp technique (tutorial below) but for the third image I rotate the camera slightly to add some movement, this can create a nice painterly look if done correctly. See top image. It is important not to rotate the camera very much.
CLICK ON THE IMAGES TO SEE THE LARGER, SHARPER VERSIONS.

My Original Soft/Sharp Multiple Exposure Technique:
Once you have your camera set up for a two-image multiple exposure, you are ready to create a Soft/Sharp effect. Start by capturing a tack sharp image. Set up on a tripod (if you want) with everything tightened down so that the image will be sharp. Use an f-stop between f/8 and f/16. This effect also works very well if the flower is backlit. Once you capture your sharp shot (your first image), take the camera off the tripod and move very close to the flower. Set the lens to manual focus and turn the focusing ring until the entire flower is defocused and the entire frame is filled with just the soft color of the flower. Take the shot (your second image). The camera will merge the two images together. I never worry that the center isn’t tack sharp-it is suppose to be a soft blur.


Image © 2017/Denise Ippolito Photography ~ An example of an original Soft/Sharp Technique without rotating

*Alternatively, you can start with capturing a soft shot and save it to use as an image overlay…more about that in another post. If you are using an Olympus Camera and have the ability to only capture (2) images for your multiple exposures I use that work around.
To learn more about multiple exposures or in camera blurs check out my new eBook “A Guide to Creative Blurs”, edited by Carol Carson and available only through A Creative Adventure.

I am heading out west today to do some additional scouting around and to also offer a private workshop for a very special client 🙂 . I’ll be sharing some shots as I get them, fingers crossed for some good stuff ahead!

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10 Responses

  1. Ron May says:

    Looks like a very interesting approach for flowers. I will definitely give it a try. Thanks for sharing this.

    Enjoy your time “out west”.

  2. Evelyn Young says:

    I am in love with your flower pictures Denise. To paraphrase the song in the James Bond movie, Nobody does it better.

  3. Carol Carson says:

    Lovely as always, Denise. And I waved in the direction of Brielle last weekend when I was in Point Pleasant Beach.

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